Start a Healthy Easter Tradition!

Sure it may be the “norm,” but Easter eggs don’t need to be filled with candy. This year, start a new (and healthier!) Easter egg hunt tradition—and make it just as fun! Here are five fun ways to incorporate movement into your family’s Easter traditions. Plus, we’ve included a list of community egg hunts in Northern Michigan.

5 Healthy Easter Egg Activities

  1. We’re calling them egg-cercises! Instead of stuffing colorful plastic eggs with sugar-filled jelly beans, try encouraging exercise and education. Write down fun activities for your kiddos to do and include them in the eggs instead. Is your little one learning to count? Or do you have an aspiring gymnast? Tailor the activities to your kids’ interests and age level. Examples include: “Do seven bunny hops;” “Do a somersault;” “Take five dinosaur stomps.” Once they complete all the activities, celebrate by gifting a jump rope or book in their Easter basket.
  2. Love football traditions? You may like this next idea. Cornhole is a staple during fall football tailgates—how about making it a springtime activity, too? It’s simple to create an Easter Bunny Cornhole using a large piece of cardboard and a hand-drawn Easter rabbit. Cut out a hole on the belly to toss plastic eggs through. If you limit the number of eggs your kids can throw per turn, they’ll be running back and forth to try their tosses over and over again!
  3. Make your own bunny trail. Draw rabbit footprints with chalk along the sidewalk or driveway, and place small piles of eggs near each spot. Or, head to your family’s favorite hiking trail! The result? Less hunting and more walking!
  4. Have competitors at home? Try racing eggs! Have family members take turns rolling decorated hard-boiled eggs down a hill. The egg that travels the furthest wins! You can make up different rules as the competition continues, guaranteeing lots of trips running up and down the hill.
  5. Our last at-home Easter egg activity is a classic. Have your kids balance an egg on a spoon, then move as fast as they can. Going in circles, hopping like a bunny, or racing to the finish line—your kids will definitely enjoy this egg-cercise! Bonus: balance activities followed by reading increases both reading scores and physical education skills in youth, so replace candy with books in their Easter basket. Read more about that here.

10 Northern Michigan Easter Egg Hunts

  1. A visit from the Easter bunny, an egg hunt, face painting, refreshments and more will be happening throughout Charlevoix on March 31. Events start at 2 p.m. Learn more.
  2. Hop on over to a community Easter egg hunt organized by age group at the First Congregational Church in Traverse City from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on March 24. Learn more.
  3. Hot dogs, lemonade, an egg hunt and basket raffle will keep the kids entertained in Kingsley! Join the fun at Kingsley Baptist Church on March 24, with registration beginning at 10:30 a.m. Learn more.
  4. Another Kingsley Easter event is happening March 25 at the Kingsley United Methodist Church. For kids up to 10 years old, an egg hunt starts at 2 p.m. at Brownson Park. Learn more.
  5. Hunt for eggs on the softball field of West Side Community Church in Traverse City beginning at 11 a.m. on March 31. Learn more.
  6. A community scavenger hunt is on the schedule following an egg hunt at 1 p.m. at Kidcopia in Kalkaska March 24. Learn more.
  7. On March 31 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m., Lifehouse Assembly is hosting their annual egg hunt in Cadillac with 10,000 eggs. Learn more.
  8. An annual allergy-free Easter egg hunt will take place March 31 in Petoskey. The Petoskey Public Library invites kids up to 12 years old to scavenger through the library for toy-filled eggs at 10 a.m. Learn more.
  9. Hosted by the Frankfort-Elberta Chamber of Commerce, the Easter Bunny will be visiting Mineral Springs Park in Frankfort along with an egg hunt at 10 a.m. Learn more.
  10. Find a golden egg amongst a crowd of hundreds of Easter eggs and win a special Easter basket at Crystal Mountain’s egg hunt March 31 starting at 10 a.m. in Thompsonville. Learn more.